Portraits of Grace: Nico & Noah

Portraits of Grace is a snapshot into the lives of the people at King's Cross Church. As "kingdom minded, kingdom people," we recognize God's work in every detail of our lives. We invite you to meet the people of our church.

Photo by Minnow Park

Who do you want to be when you grow up?
– Nico: “A fish scientist.”
-Noah: “A zoo keeper.”

What is your favorite thing about church?
– Nico: “I like CEM because we can do activities.”
– Noah: “I like worship because we can sing songs!”

When you think of Jesus what do you think of?
– Noah: “I think about the cross, because he died on the cross to make my sins go away.”
– Nico: “I think happiness, because He loves us.”

Why do you come to church?
– Nico & Noah: “To worship God!”


Portraits of Grace: Jamie

Portraits of Grace is a snapshot into the lives of the people at King's Cross Church. As "kingdom minded, kingdom people," we recognize God's work in every detail of our lives. We invite you to meet the people of our church.

Photo by Lucy Song

During the first year that our family moved into Flushing, I was at a birthday party with the boys at Chuck E Cheese. I was getting ready to redeem our tickets as a young boy begins speaking to me in Mandarin. My first thought was, ‘Why is this obnoxious kid yelling at me?’ I had gotten stuck in traffic, fought for a parking space, and dragged the kids through a busy supermarket in order to get to the party. Little did I know that the boy was actually trying to help me, saying that you couldn’t redeem tickets at the counter, you had to feed them into a machine. I probably spent more time in Flushing those first few weeks than I had in all my years in NYC. Through such moments, God was opening my eyes and my heart to the beauty and yearning of such a community. He was teaching to be more outward with myself and my family rather than seeking comfort and certainty.


Portraits of Grace: Joanne (2 of 2)

Portraits of Grace is a snapshot into the lives of the people at King's Cross Church. As "kingdom minded, kingdom people," we recognize God's work in every detail of our lives. We invite you to meet the people of our church.

Photo by Minnow Park

I have an eating disorder and it’s something that I’ve kept a secret for a very, very long time. Growing up, I always teetered between being average and overweight. This is great for people with eating disorders because no one suspects that you’re bulimic and quietly hating yourself.

When I was in the 6th grade, Teen People Magazine wrote an article about Jamie-Lynn Sigler’s recovery from anorexia. The article shared how the actress struggled with bulimia, how she only ate 500 calories a day, and spent 7 hours at the gym. The intention of the article was to dissuade teens from unhealthy eating habits, but my 11 year old brain patched together what it wanted to hear and the article became one of my earliest tutorials to developing an eating disorder. When you’re skinny and losing weight you’re considered anorexic, but when you’re heavy and losing weight you’re considered a success story. When I lost a few pounds, I received countless compliments on how great I looked — it was the fuel driving my anxiety and obsession towards food.

I was comfortable in my secret. I didn’t think other women (or men) could understand my flaws. And people treat you differently when you’re sick — they look at you with sad eyes and hold you like glass in an earthquake.

But when I first admitted that I had a problem, I found a community that recognized my brokenness and I was overwhelmed with prayer and support. Through this experience, I’ve realized the importance of accountability when you want to live honestly and responsibly. I am thankful towards my King’s Cross community that has given me a deeper understanding of what it means to be vulnerable and completely accepted. (2/2)


Portraits of Grace: Joanne (1 of 2)

Portraits of Grace is a snapshot into the lives of the people at King's Cross Church. As "kingdom minded, kingdom people," we recognize God's work in every detail of our lives. We invite you to meet the people of our church.

Photo by Minnow Park

I was 6 when I first learned how to unlove myself. A classmate told me that my eyes were too small, my nose was too flat and my body was too big. I was a minority within my peers, TV shows and even my Barbies told me I was different. It’s like being an extra puzzle piece; I was someone that could never fit in. In art class, I used to draw “myself” with blonde hair and blue eyes. My art teacher would always tell me, “Joanne, this isn’t you!”— I didn’t want to be me. There was always a reason to feel ugly or inadequate. Even at 6, I saw my flaws and shortcomings as too big and my identity in God as not enough.

I still struggle with the same thing, but under a different context. There are days when the world tells me that I’m a failure and my insecurities say I’m a disappointment. I am coated in sin and my “real self” is unloveable. Yet, the best thing in my life sees within and beyond my imperfections and says that He loves me and that He will always love me. Is that grace?  (1/2)